Liturgical Ministry Formation Workshops

Carmel Bulletin, 6 October 2019

We are merely servants: we have done no more than our duty.

Luke 17:10

Today’s gospel reminds us of the humility of serving others.  One way that we can place ourselves at the service of God and our neighbour is through engagement in liturgical ministry. 

The Second Vatican Council reminds us that “in the liturgy the whole public worship is performed by the Mystical Body of Jesus Christ, that is, by the Head and his members.” (Constitution on the Liturgy, no. 7).  Every one of us has a role in offering worship, in union with Jesus, to God the Father. 

From the assembly of all the baptised, people are called to help lead our prayer through particular ministries.  Serving as a liturgical minister allows us to follow St Paul’s words from the second reading, to “fan into a flame the gift that God gave you.”

Each year, we seek to support Ministers of the Word and Extraordinary Ministers of Holy Communion through formation workshops.  These workshops are an important part of serving God and our community, and all ministers are asked to participate.

Please claim these dates in your diary now!

Ministers of the Word can choose from one of two times:

  • Wednesday 23 October at 7:00 pm or
  • Saturday 26 October at 9:30 am.

Extraordinary Ministers of Holy Communion can choose from one of two times:

  • Saturday 26 October at 10:45 am or
  • Wednesday 30 October at 7:00 pm.

Register online now

4/7/10 – The Liturgical Presences of Christ

At present, we are exploring the liturgical principles which underpin our work in the Church Renewal Process.  Having considered how the whole body of Christ celebrates the liturgy, we now consider the second principle, namely:

The liturgical presences of Christ

Hopefully we all agree that Christ is present in the Eucharist.  When I make that statement, some people will hear “Eucharist” and immediately think of the consecrated bread and wine which, during Mass, become the Body and Blood of Christ.  In this case, Christ is present in the Eucharist.

Yet since the Second Vatican Council in the 1960’s, we have also come to understand the term “Eucharist” to mean the Mass itself.  Using the word Eucharist in this way, we then are saying that Christ is present in the entire celebration of the Mass, not just communion.  Is this statement equally true?

The bishops of the Second Vatican Council (see article 7) referred back to the teaching of the Council of Trent, as well as to the gospels themselves, to remind us that while Christ is made present especially through Holy Communion, this is not the only way.  When we celebrate the Mass, Christ is also made present through the liturgical assembly; the entire community gathered together to pray and celebrate.  Christ is made present also through the priest who leads the assembly and celebrates the Mass in Jesus’ name.  Christ is also made present to us at Mass through the proclamation of the Word.  This was quite a shift in understanding for us as a Catholic community who, before then, were very much focused on the sacramental actions the priest performed during Mass.

So it is through all that we say and do together as a worshipping community that Christ is made present within us and amongst us during the celebration of the Eucharist.